27 Things Only a New Mum Will Understand

When I heard my cousin complaining about how pregnancy is tough as she cannot lie down properly nor eat the spicy food she wants because of heart burns, I thought to myself “hmmm… and this is just the fun part, the hard work is yet to come’.

The baby doesn’t come with a manual and even if he/she did I believe the longest part of it would be the ‘trouble-shooting’ part! As new mums we don’t have a clue of most things, so when dad or ‘others’ (remember everyone knows better than you how to take care of your baby) ask you why is the baby crying or keep telling you the baby is hungry (even when you just fed for the last 30 minutes!), or (the best one) advise you to ‘sleep while the baby is sleeping’, you really want to pull all your hair out!

New mums, don’t lose hope, you will soon learn all the strings; you are great since you can do everything that you are doing even though you’ve never been trained for it. You will get there. Motherhood is hard but so rewarding and so worth it. So, hang in there! YOU ARE DOING A GREAT JOB!!!

The following was written by Julie Lay and I’m sure most new mums will agree as these are things only a new mum will understand.

1. The complete joy of a warm sitz bath.

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2. Being so afraid to poop that you avoid the bathroom at all costs.

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3. Having incredible boobs … that hurt so badly you’ll kill anyone who so much as brushes up against them.

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4. That taking a shower is a luxury, not a necessity.

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5. The isolation of being alone with a tiny, helpless human. All. Day. LONG.

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6. Celebrating your new eau de parfum: slightly spoiled milk, cabbage, and A+D ointment.

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7. The fear that every other mother in the world is doing a better job than you.

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8. What a dairy cow feels like.

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9. Loving your other half for giving you such an amazing gift.

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10.Hating your other half for the way they eat/sleep/breathe.

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11. What it feels like to have no shame about whipping out a boob in public.

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12. The feeling of victory that fitting into your pre-pregnancy clothes awards you (no matter how much muffin is left on top).

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13. Using the baby as a legitimate excuse to get out of absolutely anything.

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14. Wearing granny panties that are made out of mesh and come up to your eyeballs.

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15. Why you can no longer do jumping jacks. Ever again.

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16. Watching a horror movie and sympathizing with the zombies. If you can stay awake, that is.

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17. Going so crazy with fatigue you find yourself mindlessly rocking a jug of milk to sleep at the grocery store.

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18. That “mother’s intuition” is real. And it is powerful.

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19. The pure joy that is a first glass of wine after nine LONG months of sobriety.

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20. The joy/embarrassment that are Preparation H pads.

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21. Being so in tune with someone that your body actually produces food for them on demand.

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22. Accidental shoplifting.

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23. Leaking through your shirt during an important presentation at work.

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24. Waking up in a cold sweat, convinced you rolled over on the baby — only to find them sleeping soundly in their crib.

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25. That “sleep when the baby sleeps” is the stupidest phrase anyone has ever uttered.

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26. Being proud of the fact that your stomach looks like it was attacked by a tiger.

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27. The amazing feeling of being the one who created this unique human being.

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My favourite is the last one (#27). I totally agree. What do YOU think?

 

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How NORAD became the world’s official Santa-tracker

Santa Claus norad

An interesting article I came across from Los Angeles Times, written by Karen Kaplan.

U.S. Northern Command Chief of Staff Maj. Gen. Charles D. Luckey and volunteers take phone calls from children around the world. A misprint in a newspaper advertisement kicked off NORAD’s Santa-tracking activities 60 years ago.

December 25, 2015, 5:44 a.m.

It was December 1955, the height of the Cold War, when the red phone on Col. Harry Shoup’s desk at the Continental Air Defense Command began to ring.

Only an elite few knew the number. Odds were good that a four-star general from the Pentagon was on the other end of the line.

Shoup reached for the phone.

“Yes, sir. This is Col. Shoup,” he said.

No response.

“Sir? This is Col. Shoup.” Pause. “Sir, can you read me all right?”

That’s when Shoup heard the little girl’s voice.

“Are you really Santa Claus?”

For the last 60 years, officials at the North American Aerospace Defense Command at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo., have tracked Santa’s whirlwind tour across the globe to deliver presents on Christmas Eve. Nearly 9 million people from more than 200 countries are expected to check in with NORAD’s Santa-tracking website before they go to bed on Christmas Eve.

And it all began with that phone call.

As Shoup later recalled in a home video, his first response to the unlikely query was that someone was pulling his leg — and he wasn’t amused.

“I said, ‘Would you repeat that please?'” he replied.

“Are you really Santa Claus?”

That’s when he realized two things: Something had gone wrong with his phone, and the question was genuine.

So he told the little girl on the other end of the line that he was, indeed, Santa Claus. Relieved, she informed him that she would be leaving him food by her fireplace, plus treats for his reindeer as well.

“I said, ‘Oh boy, they sure will appreciate that!’”

Then Shoup asked to speak to her mother. That’s how he learned that a Sears, Roebuck & Co. advertisement in the local newspaper had invited kids to call Santa at ME 2-6681 — the number for the red phone.

It was a misprint, of course, but that didn’t stop kids from flooding the line all the way until Christmas. Shoup assigned a couple of airmen to answer the line and act like St. Nick, Shoup’s daughter Pamela Farrell recounted to StoryCorps.

After a few weeks, someone at the Continental Air Defense Command (which is now NORAD) had an inspired idea. He went to the giant glass board where airmen tracked the planes in U.S. or Canadian airspace and added a drawing of a sleigh with eight reindeer. They were headed south from the North Pole.

Shoup studied the board. Then he picked up his phone, his other daughter, Terri Van Keuren, told StoryCorps.

“He called a local radio station and said, ‘This is the commander of the Combat Alert Center, and we have an unidentified flying object — why, it looks like a sleigh!’”

After that, Van Keuren added, stations would call every hour to ask for the latest on Santa’s whereabouts.

The military’s Santa-tracking efforts have become considerably more elaborate since 1955. NORAD’s online tracker plays Christmas tunes while flying reindeer pull a red sleigh over images of the Earth provided by NASA. The site shows Santa’s last stop and gives an ETA for his next destination. It also keeps a running tab of the number of gifts delivered.

Those who find websites passé can download the NORAD Tracks Santa app from the iTunes store, follow @NoradSanta on Twitter, “like” NORAD’s tracker on Facebook or keep tabs through a variety of other social media sites.

More than 70,000 children still call NORAD to talk to Santa on a toll-free line — (877) HI-NORAD or (877) 446-6723 — and another 12,000 or so send e-mails to noradtrackssanta@outlook.com.

All of this would have been impossible for Shoup to imagine as he spoke to the little girl who inadvertently kicked the whole thing off 60 years ago.

Before handing the phone to her mother, the girl asked a question that was certainly appropriate for an Air Force colonel: How is it possible for Santa to visit so many houses in a single night?

Years later, Shoup still remembered his answer: “I said, ‘That’s the magic of Christmas.’”

You can follow Karen Kaplan on Twitter @LATkarenkaplan and also ‘like’ Los Angeles Times Science and Health on Facebook.

Have you been tracking Santa with your kids or you’ve already told them that Santa is not real?

 

Fish and Mercury — it’s important to know how much of which fish type you are eating.

children eat fish

Photo: tomolivernutrition.com

 

When discussing fish with my young niece, I became quite alarmed to see that she didn’t have a clue about mercury level in fish. She had marlin for lunch! I thought I’d draw mums’ and dads’ attention to ‘Fish and Mercury’ so that they are better aware of the risks involved with eating some particular types of fish.

The following article from the New South Wales (Australia) website sums it all up and can be quite helpful to choose how often to give which type of fish to children and also for pregnant mums and women planning pregnancy.

Fish and Mercury (Source: NSW Food Authority)

It’s good to eat enough fish, especially when pregnant or breastfeeding. Fish are a valuable source of protein, minerals, vitamin B12 and iodine. They are low in saturated fat and contain omega-3 fatty acids which are important for the development of babies’ central nervous systems before and after birth.

Selecting Fish

Most fish in Australia are low in mercury but some are higher and too much mercury can harm developing nervous systems. It’s best to know the mercury levels of different types of fish and how often to eat each type.

Pregnant & breastfeeding women & women planning pregnancy

1 serve equals 150g

Children up to 6 years

1 serve equals 75g

Eat 2-3 serves per week of any fish and seafood not listed below
OR
Eat 1 serve per week of these fish, and no other fish that week:

Catfish or Orange Roughy (Deep Sea Perch)

OR
1 serve per fortnight of these fish, and no other fish that fortnight:

Shark (Flake) or Billfish (Swordfish, Marlin)

 

Mercury from fish is generally not a health consideration for most people, it is mainly an issue for women planning pregnancy, pregnant women, breastfeeding women and children up to six years.

Ready-to-each, chilled seafood, such as raw sushi, sashimi & oysters or pre-cooked prawns and smoked salmon can be risk for pregnant women because of listeria. Our guidelines have more information about listeria and what to avoid during pregnancy.

Mercury in Fish

Mercury occurs naturally in the environment and accumulates in the aquatic food chain, including fish, as methyl-mercury. All fish contain some methyl-mercury, but most fish in Australian waters have very low mercury levels.

Mercury content is not reduced by processing techniques such as canning, freezing or cooking. Many fish have low mercury levels.

The following fish have low mercury levels and are also high in omega-3 fatty acids:

  • Mackerel
  • Silver Warehou
  • Atlantic Salmon
  • Canned salmon & canned tuna in oil
  • Herrings
  • Sardines

Other seafood with low mercury levels include:

  • All prawns, lobsters and bugs
  • All squids and octopus
  • Snapper
  • Salmon and trout
  • Trevally
  • Whiting
  • Herring
  • Anchovy
  • Bream
  • Mullet
  • Garfish

These fish can be eaten more frequently, up to two to three times per week.

 

canned fishCanned Tuna & Salmon

It is generally safe for all population groups, including pregnant women, to consume 2-3 serves of any type of tuna or salmon a week, canned or fresh.

Canned tuna usually has lower mercury levels than other tuna because tuna used for canning are smaller species that are caught when less than one year old.

Supplements

Fish oil products and supplements are not a major source of dietary mercury and there is no recommendation to restrict consuming them because of mercury.

Crustacea & Molluscs

Crustacea (including prawns, lobster and crabs) and molluscs (including oysters and calamari) are not a concern because they generally contain lower levels of mercury and are usually consumed less often than finfish.

Fish for Others

Breastfeeding mothers can continue to eat fish.

Fish are rich in protein and minerals, low in saturated fat, and contain omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for the development of your baby’s central nervous system, even after birth.

Although it’s important to continue to eat fish while you are breastfeeding, you need to be careful about which fish you choose. Some fish may contain mercury levels that can harm a baby’s developing nervous system if too much mercury is passed to them through breastmilk.

To safely include fish as an important part of a balanced diet while you are breastfeeding, follow the same guidelines provided to pregnant women.

Kids eat fishFish is good for young children

The healthy nutrients found in fish are excellent for growing children. Simply follow the guidelines for children up to 6 years.

 

Exceeding the Recommended Guidelines

Like all foods, fish should be eaten as part of a varied and balanced diet. Over-consumption of any single food group, particularly to the exclusion of other foods, is not recommended because it can lead to dietary imbalances and may increase your intake of potentially harmful substances, such as mercury.

If you have been eating more than 2-3 serves of fish in the past, you can follow the recommended number of weekly portions and your mercury levels will return to normal fairly soon.

Mercury levels will generally halve within several months, providing you follow the dietary advice and limit the amount of Shark (Flake) and Billfish (Swordfish, Marlin) you consume. If you are concerned about your mercury levels, your doctor can order a blood and/or urine test.

If you choose to eat more than 2-3 serves of fish per week it is important to eat a variety of fish, and avoid those that could have elevated mercury levels, such as Shark (Flake) or Billfish (Swordfish, Marlin).

Have you had any issue with mercury level in your blood or that of your child? When did you last have a blood test?

 

Life out of a Suitcase — 47 days and counting …

Life out of a suitcase

Who wouldn’t dream to stay in a hotel for…ever? Really? Well, staying in a hotel sounds so much fun and exciting, if the hotel’s name sounds like the five star St Regis or Marsa Malaz Kempinski. However it can be a completely different story when you have just moved to Doha, Qatar, you are surrounded by buildings, the temperature is almost always around 40 degrees Celcius, the hotel is a two star (?) and when you are so much used to seeing the blue sky of Perth and Mauritius!

Marhaba! The temperature is 41 degrees Celcius today and I’m in Doha; more exactly in Msheireb, also known as the heart of Doha. It is one of the cities having a make over in view of the FIFA World Cup 2022 at the estimated cost of 20 billion QR. The aim is to redevelop the city while at the same time conserving the historical downtown Doha. Im in a hotel with my family. It is officially rated 4 star but when you compare it to a Mauritian 4 star hotel or an Australian one it looks more like a two star! The apartment is not huge but spacious enough for the three of us: 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom suite, 1 toilet, kitchen with all decent amenities and a living area.The hotel being a 2 star (?), the state of the carpet can keep you wondering how many people have been here before.

When we relocated to Doha, we were given this hotel accommodation while waiting to get a ‘real’ one (accommodation NOT hotel) from the Ministry of Housing. The way the housing system works for expats here is quite difficult to understand at first (specially for a neo-Doha traveller like myself) and the process can be quite long. From my understanding so far: the family sponsor (in this case my husband) needs to go through a medical test, wait for the results, get his Qatari ID, sign his work contract and then submit it to the Department of Housing of the company. The rest of the family goes through the same process to get the Qatari ID. The Ministry of Housing has a long list of companies/institutions and a list of villas and apartments which it then distributes according to the number of people in the family, the company/institution where the sponsor works, and his ‘grade’ in the workplace. My family consists of 3 people so it is highly improbable that I will be allocated a villa with 4 or 6 bedrooms! If there are no 2 or 3 bedrooms apartments available, my family will stay on the waiting list a bit longer — which means back to living out of a suitcase for a few more days. Or months, who knows?

Life out of a Suitcase: The Fun Side

  • Don’t have to worry about changing the bedsheets, the towels, emptying the bins. It’s done everyday or as per request.
  • Don’t have to worry about cleaning or vacuuming, changing light bulbs or any maintenance.
  • The hotel apartment is a decent size so everything is accessible.
  • Its location is perfect! It’s close to mostly everything and we can easily drive to main shopping centres.
  • It has a gym, swimming pool, restaurant (although I haven’t had the chance to enjoy these facilities yet, my 2 year old keeping me fit and entertained during the day!)
  • Dont have to worry about paying bills (AC needed day and night) and there are so many satellite channels that I can watch two/three channels at the same time! And remember: it’s all free!
  • Free WIFI.
  • After a while, even your child will know that he/she lives in a hotel and he/she is waiting to get a ‘home’.
  • Your child will end up knowing all his/her books, toys, songs, many of the staff names and may even know how to count 1-20 before she turns two. He/she may even start to read some engineering books of the sponsor!

Life out of a Suitcase: The Down Side

  • I feel that I wear the same clothes all the time; even my husband asked me if I didn’t have other clothes (I do have about 5 dresses, a pair of jeans, 3 leggings and a few t-shirts with me).
  • We got our ‘boxes’ shipped last week and have put everything in the living room and the bedroom; suddenly the place is looking smaller and a bit crammed (surprising?)
  • Can be frustrating when you know you have all your stuff in the boxes but you don’t want to take everything out as anytime you can ‘get’ a ‘house’ and have to pack again to move there.
  • Cannot do anything outside because of the heat. It’s shopping centres or home/hotel.

I dont know how many more days we’ll be living out of our suitcases. It’s been fun till now. However living in continuous suspense can become tiring and frustrating after a while. Let’s hope we hear from ‘housing’ well before we reach that level or before my two-year old starts counting to 30 or 40! Who knows?

Is Your Child Eating Too Much Salt?

Kids Eat too much salt

Whenever I eat at my parents’ or at the in-laws’, I always think the food has too much salt. And what’s worrying is that I’m the only one! Everyone keeps telling me I have a problem with my taste buds! You know what? I found out that I DID! It was my taste buds because I wasn’t used to eating that much salt in food. It’s all relative: my parents and in laws find the salt level ‘normal’ but for me it is not. It’s all a question of being used to salt. That’s why I am so amazed when mums tell me they add salt to their babies’ food when they start on solids, as early as 5 to 6 months old! They argue they want to make sure the baby likes the food by making it more tasty. What they do not know, unfortunately, is that babies do not need additional salt and they are the ones who are getting them used to that taste!

The Health Foundation in Australia recommends that an adult consumes less than 6 grams of salt a day, that’s about 1 teaspoon. And we are talking here not only about salt that we add to food when cooking but also to hidden salt in all the foods that we eat. The Health Foundation aims at reducing premature death and suffering from heart, stroke, and blood vessel disease in Australia. It warns about the high intake of salt which can increase blood pressure and lead to a high risk of many other diseases. It is alarming to know that the average Australian consumes about 9 grams of salt everyday. I don’t always check the labels of food products that I buy but I always try to buy healthy food and avoid processed food and take aways as these are so high in salt.

There is now evidence that a high intake of salt in children also influences their blood pressure and can lead them to develop many diseases later in life such as high blood pressure, osteoporosis and even obesity. How children eat when they are young heavily influences their food choices and likings in later life. If they have been used to eating salty food, this is what they will like later in life. It is better for them not to be encouraged to develop a preference for salt when they are little in order to avoid exposing them to all the health risks related to high salt intake. Children should rather be encouraged to eat healthy snacks such as fresh fruits, dried fruits, fresh vegetable sticks and yoghurt. Their food should be cooked without salt if possible. There is already natural salt in vegetables and the taste of other foods such as meat, chicken, etc. can be enhanced by adding spices and herbs. I have tried it and it does work. It is all a question of getting used to eating less salt or no salt at all. If you do it gradually then very soon you will find it hard to eat out or to buy take away!

According to the Health Foundation and other health institutions this is how much salt children can eat per day in order to stay healthy and to avoid risks linked to over-consumption of salt.

Age Maximum Salt Intake
0-6 months <1g / day
6-12 months 1g / day
1-3 years 2g / day
4-6 years 3g / day
7-10 years 5g / day
11 years and above 6g / day

Babies’ kidneys are too immature to deal with added salt and anyway, they require very tiny amount daily. Both breast milk and baby formula consist of that required amount of salt and do not need any added salt to their food. When babies start on solids, although their food may taste very bland to us (remember it’s all a question of being used to salt), salt must not be added. As far as possible it is best to feed baby home made food and avoid processed food as even sauces and other stocks contain too much added salt. 75% of our salt intake come from the ready-made and processed foods. It is always important to check the nutritional information on food products that you plan to give your children and choose those with low salt content. Be mindful of products such as bread, baked beans, crisps, olives, cheese and even biscuits which already contain salt. When choosing breakfast cereals, make sure you are choosing one which has a low salt level. I used the recommendations of Choice Magazine for my baby. It compares various products and lists their salt and sugar levels.

When eating out, be mindful what you are feeding your child. A large portion of chips can contain over 1g of salt and 4 slices of bread can provide 2g of salt; so in only one meal your child can eat much more salt that he is required to eat over a few days!You can use the following as a guide: food containing more than 0.6g of sodium per 100g is considered as high in salt.

Making sure your child doesn’t eat too much salt means you’re also trying to ensure that he doesn’t develop a taste for salty food; this will makes him less likely to eat too much salt as an adult. As mentioned earlier, if you are already giving your child too much salt, just decrease it gradually. It would be a good idea to do it for the family as a whole at the same time. The whole family will benefit from it. It makes so much sense that salt is often referred to as the slow poison and we definitely don’t want that for us nor for our kids, do we?

Finland’s Education System: a win-win for all?

students are back to school

It’s back to school time in Doha. Back to waking up early, back to spending hours in traffic and back to spending the afternoons doing homeworks. The race starts at Kindergarten here when kids as young as 4 are prepared for the entry exam/interview to obtain a seat in a ‘top’ primary school of their choice. In Mauritius too, the competition is quite tough and private tuition starts in all subjects as early as the 4th grade of primary school and usually only ends at the end of high school! I cannot but ask: why not simply copy Finland’s education system?

When the first results from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) were out, not even the Finns could believe it. PISA is a standardised test given to 15-year-olds in more than 40 global venues. It revealed Finnish youth to be the best young readers in the world. Three years later, they were the leaders in math and in 2006, first in science. In the 2009 PISA, they came second in science, third in reading and sixth in math among nearly half a million students worldwide.

Some Interesting Facts (from Smithsonian):

  • According to a survey by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the differences between the strongest and weakest students are the smallest in the world.
  • There are no mandated standardised tests in Finland, apart from one exam at the end of high school.
  • There are no rankings, no comparisons or competition between students, schools or regions.
  • Finland’s schools are publicly funded.
  • Formal education only starts at the age of 7.
  • Everyone in the government agencies running them, are educators; not business people, not politicians.
  • Every school has the same national goals and recruits staff from the same pool of university-trained educators.

The result is that a Finnish kid is given the opportunity to get the same quality education no matter where he lives. The majority of educators in Finland are professionals selected from the top 10% of its graduates who then study for a masters degree in education. Many schools are quite small to enable teachers to know every student. Teachers are always trying new methods to enable students to succeed. No wonder 93% of Finns graduate from academic or vocational high schools, 17.5 percentage points higher than the United States, and 66% pursue higher education, the highest rate in the European Union.

Australia and Mauritius

It was fortunate for our kids that, when drafting the National Curriculum, the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) reflected on practices in countries that performed ‘better’ like Singapore and Finland. Good on Australia for that! However, due to a change in Australia’s federal government, the National Curriculum has only been partly implemented till now.

With a change of government in Mauritius too, the educational system is being reformed with a nine-year schooling system being introduced. It looks as if only the form is changing, most of the content staying the same. The competition will only shift at a later level, the tuitions will still be there and the severe competition at the end of the secondary schooling will still exist. The government has not unveiled the whole reform plan yet so I am hoping there will be more positives than the present system has.

Curriculum is important but so are educators. Educators should be given both the means and the motivations to be able to perform well. Unlike how I felt when I was working (both in Perth and in Mauritius), educators cannot simply be a number in the system, which can move from one school to another at any decided time. They cannot be expected to give their best when education has started to look more like a business where everything is about making money or cutting costs; they cannot be expected to look at teaching as a vocation and not a job, when they are only given respect according to how their students perform. Wake up people, education is NOT business! Check out Finland.

A great read is fillingmymap.com/2015/04/15/11-ways-finlands-education-system-shows-us-that-less-is-more/

Waiting for the Australian review and for the Mauritian Nine-Year Schooling Reform Project…

New Giant IPad Launching Soon: Is Technology That Good For Our Kids?

technology and kids. how does it affect our kids?

examiner.com

Apple is set to launch its new ‘giant’ IPad this Wednesday alongside other gadgets. Tech savvy and gadget addicts cannot wait for their new toys. This reminded me of a book I came across about 3 years ago warning against the threat of Television becoming the new teacher. Can technology truly become the new teacher? Is it really that good?

Since I’ve read that book I became very conscious of the negative effects exposure to screens can have (particularly) for babies. Till now I have succeeded to avoid my toddler from playing games, watching TV and using a phone. Yes I have. And people are still horrified by the sound of it since it is not the normal thing to do! I thought I had been doing the right thing until one of my husband’s colleagues told me recently that he had decided to do exactly the opposite and his 8 months old baby plays games on an IPad and also watches TV. He doesn’t believe in research supporting the ‘negative effects’ of TV and tablets. This made me start wondering ‘are these really bad?

He argued that it’s okay as long as the kids are supervised when they are using the device. In this way the device is not really teaching them bad things as you are always there to monitor and explain. True. But how does it work in practice? Do you always stay with your child when he is using an IPad or watching TV? Commercials pop up all the time. How will you monitor what they are watching? On the Internet, what will your child do when pop ups will try to redirect him towards something inappropriate? What will you do regarding issues associated with the Internet like cyber bullying, gaming and other addictive behaviours? Will you watch everything your child sees before he does it so that you know it’s appropriate for his age? I mean how does it work in reality? 

I recently received an email claiming that “behavioural neuroscientists in the United Kingdom, United States and Australia released findings of increased addictive electronic device behaviour and reductions in academic concentration, attention, memory retention and learning outcomes”. The study found that along with early patterns of inappropriate behaviours (0 – 3 age range) children’s brains are being bombarded and scrambled by the use of many electronic devices making students unable to concentrate for any long period of time, listen and respond to instructions and complete activities. Experts recommend that phones not be given to children before 13 years of age and even then, it should only be a ‘dumb’ phone, not a ‘smart’ phone. I know, I know. That’s just one side of the story. However, wouldn’t there even be an iota of truth in there? And if there is, would I want to take a risk? Or one might ask: how much risk am I willing to take?

I fully believe in IT and its numerous advantages and I also believe it is my duty as a parent to assist my child with positive developmental experiences. So, if I can restrict the electronic devices in the early years and monitor closely later, I believe that would be a great start to those. I believe I can be a better teacher to my child than TV, tablets or other electronic devices can be. What do you think?

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